#1179 Inquiry Videos in the News

Recently our local paper picked up the story of the rise in popularity of the inquiry videos aimed at kindergarten to grade 3 students:

The Inquiry videos have attracted more than 1250 subscribers and have been viewed 40,000 times.

Watch a recent video about swamp sounds:

Watch the latest video about probability and weather:

#1178 One Year Anniversary – Online Inquiry Videos

One year ago – April 25, 2020 – I posted the first of my inquiry videos that set the tone of the 70 that have followed…

It all started shortly after COVID closed our schools. An educational assistant and teacher suggested I create a short video to share with the Grade 1s in our school. I didn’t take long to agree. Thanks Kristine and Jenna!

A big thanks to you, the students, teachers and families for watching and inspiring me to create more.
I had hoped to reach 1000 subscribers by the one year anniversary.
Today, there are 1107 subscribers.
Thank-you!

Please subscribe and click notifications on if you want to hear about the latest videos before everyone else!

Watch this recent video Swamp Sounds! What’s Making all that Noise?!

#1177 Inquiry Video Anniversary (and Subscriber Goal!)

Shortly after COVID shut down live schooling a year ago, I created a video to support students learning from home…

Almost a year later, 70 inquiry videos support young students learning from home, public schools and forest schools. The videos support math, language, science through questions and curiosity – usually with an outdoor focus.

Since April 2020, the videos have boomed a little boom. At time of writing videos have attracted 981 subscribers. My goal is to exceed 1000 subscribers by the video anniversary – April 25, 2021.

Want to support young learners?

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… And click the notification bell to receive news of the latest videos:

The most viewed video:

One of my favourites:

Another favourite:

A recent video:

The first one in the style adopted:

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#1173 Kindergarten and Primary Inquiry Videos – Gravity, Mystery Hole and Frozen Ponds

What keeps the water in the upside down bucket?!
What lives in the hole in the ground??
Why is the pond water hard?

This month’s videos challenge young learners to think, question and develop strategies to find the answers.

Watch the inquiry videos. They have easy connections to Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum!

See the notes (underneath the YouTube video in the description) for learning extensions and links to more information.

How does the water stay in the bucket… even when it’s upside down?!

Who or what lives in the hole in the ground?!

What happened to the water?

See all the videos.

We’re always looking for ideas to support Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3 learning with links to the Ontario curriculum and appropriate for homeschoolers and Forest School fans!

Subscribe and share!

#1172 Inquiry Videos for Kinder and Elementary Students, Homeschoolers and Forest School

What keeps my milk in the cup?
Why are lemons and bubbles circular or spherical?
Building bird nests and human homes…

This month’s videos challenge young learners to think, question and develop strategies to find the answers.

Watch the inquiry videos. They have easy connections to Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum!

See the notes (underneath the YouTube video in the description) for learning extensions and links to more information.

What keeps my milk in the cup? What happens to a cup of milk in outer space?

Why are lemons (and so many other things in nature) spherical?!

Building bird nests and human homes… What would you use to build a home?

See all the videos.

We’re always looking for ideas to support Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3 learning with links to the Ontario curriculum and appropriate for homeschoolers and Forest School fans!

Subscribe and share!

#1169 Pigs, Patterns, Sticks & Stones: Inquiry Videos for Kindergarten and Primary Students!

What do you know about pigs?
Find a way out of the fern forest using patterns!
What’s the difference between sticks and stones?!

This month’s videos challenge young learners to think, question and develop strategies to find answers.

Watch the videos. 
See the notes (underneath the YouTube video in the description) for learning extensions and links to more information.

PIGS!
Kindergaretn & primary grade inquiry into the the life of pigs on the farm!


Patterns
Where do you see patterns? Help Mr. Harry describe them and see if he can get out of the fern forest!


Sticks & Stones!
How are they different?
Which one floats?
Which one sinks?
WHY!?

See all the videos including:
• Baby chicks
• Gus the bull calf
• Wasps and nests

We’re always looking for ideas to support Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3 learning with links to the Ontario curriculum and appropriate for homeschoolers and Forest School fans!

Subscribe and share!

#1168 Wiggly Worms, Decomposing, and BUGS!

What lives underground and wriggles?
Which decomposes faster: an apple core or a wrapper?
Black flies, mosquitoes and dragon flies: whose team do you want to be on?!

This month’s videos challenge young learners to think, question and develop strategies to find answers.

Watch the videos. 
See the notes underneath for learning extensions.

Wiggly worms!
Kindergaretn & Grade 1 inquiry into the the life of worms, soil and dirt!

Decomposing!
Which decomposes faster? Apple cores or wrappers?
Inquiry into natural vs plastic waste!

Bugs!!!
Who do you want on your team?
Black flies?
Mosquitoes?
Dragon flies?
… Pick very carefully!

See all the videos including:
• Mystery forest object
• Being happy
• Heart and breathing

We’re always looking for ideas to support Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3 learning with links to the Ontario curriculum and appropriate for homeschoolers and Forest School fans!

Subscribe and share!

#1144 Too Safe?

Can we be too safe?” a parent asked me after learning about our day’s adventure.

We had hiked a long looping trail. During snack the children realized we were high on a ridge just above our starting point. They wanted to take the short, steep direct route back to the start.

Risky play?

What came out of my mouth was the uncertainty about the potential dragons in their caves and the possibility of boiling pits of lava.

What was in my head was the steep, & rocky descent with snow, ice and unknown cliffs as well as my unfamiliarity with that part of the forest. Also, I was well aware I was solo with children under 12 years of age.

The students could guess there were likely no dragons and lava. But while discussing the real risks they started to understand the challenges of the unknown descent. I promised I would investigate the steep forest in the week ahead… and we hiked the long, safe way down.

After more solo exploration during the week I was satisfied we could descend safely as a group. The next week we retraced our uphill expedition and discussed how we could descend safely. We were practicing “risky play.”

Different groups need different levels of support to explore safety and risk. But, if asked to analyze risk, people are usually very capable to assess what is safe for them.

We had a good experience. We weighed the risks and found ways to minimize the hazards. The children practiced the valuable skill of testing their perception and reality of safety.

Regulating Risk
I often see or hear of students denied experiences that offer the ability to develop their self-regulating sense of safety. Managed scenarios can help build self preservation, self awareness and a better ability to stay safe in life.

When I teach at Forest School we talk a lot about risk and safety…
“Can we climb that tree?”
“What do you think?…”

We talk about hazards, risks and what is reasonable. Students usually come to a reasonable conclusion with support and guidance. As we explore more, students get better at assessing risk and regulating their own limits:
“Can I go higher?”
“What do you think?”
“I think this is high enough for me…”

Risk Assessments and Risk Management

Telling vs Learning
A couple of years ago, I picked up my own son from school on our bikes on a cool spring afternoon. I asked him to put on his coat. He told me he didn’t need one. He needed a coat to stay warm. But I said “Ok.” We started riding. He lasted less than a minute before stopping because he was cold. He decided to put on his coat…

Instead of being told he needed his coat, he learned he needed his coat.
Big difference. It’s called experiential education.

Can we, as parents, teachers, educators be too safe?
Hmm. We can teach risk assessment, regulation and safety with careful planning and management of “risky play.”