#1194 More Trees!

I recently saw a post from 3 or 4 years ago of the first tree I had planted of a small tree plantation project. It worked hard to establish itself but is growing well now. See the same tree below 3-4 years apart.

Pine Tree
Newly planted pine tree 2018 Chelsea Quebec
Pine Tree October 2022
Same Pine Tree 2022 Chelsea Quebec.

Tiny Forest
In other exciting news, I’ve been working towards a school based project to plant a “Tiny Forest.” After writing an initial proposal, we have received our first approval. Fingers crossed we move ahead next spring…

A tiny forest?
The Tiny Forest idea was started by Japanese Botanist, Akira Miyawaki who started planting small dense forests in urban areas. Watch the video from the BBC World Service, below for more information on tiny forests:

#1192 Christine Persaud, Film Maker – Supporting New Creators.

In 2021 I was approached by Christine Persaud, a film maker, who wanted to feature my process in creating the series of inquiry videos aimed at young learners.

She was hired by the Global Interagency Security Forum (GISF) to help their members create better training programmes and grow awareness of appropriate storytelling.

Christine interviewed and filmed my video creation process. You can watch her video below:

I am pleased with her video and grateful to be asked.
And very happy to help others create content…

#1189 Bird Nest

A bird has made a nest 3 metres from our front door. Below is a series of very short videos documenting the bird’s nesting / laying cycle.

The bird does this most years very close to our front door and we are vey careful to be mindful of the birds’ needs.

April 20, 2022. The nest is being built:

April 25, 2022. The first egg appears:

April 27, 2022. More eggs appear:

April 28, 2022. The mama bird protects the eggs:

May 2, 2022. Our nest blew away in a wind storm (April 29th.) Eggs were lost. Mat Gorr continues to document his robin nest (Thanks Mat!):

#1181 Trees for Schools (and Parks and Earth)

In the fall of 2015 I was weeding our garden. I pulled a small spruce tree.
As it came out of the ground I realized that tree was valuable for our classroom and the students.
I quickly planted it in a pot and brought it to school. We learned about the tree, science and math… it even served as our class Christmas tree. It was a weedy “Charlie Brown Christmas Tree” but it was perfect!

In the spring, we planted the tree at school. Students wrote a wish on a cedar shim that were placed around the tree. At the end of the school year I asked a student if she ever visited the class tree in the school yard. “Everyday,” she beamed!


I realized the power of trees in the classroom…
Since then I have built learning around potted trees that I introduce to class. We write about them, compare them, measure them, research them… and eventually the trees get planted at school. Students develop a connection with the trees (and related learning.) So good.

Rewind 30+ years: I worked as a tree planter for 4 summers and planted about 240,000 trees in Ontario and Alberta, Quebec and British Columbia. It was a tough job. I loved it. I still have access to two of the tiny trees from 1989. They’re now 5 metres tall.

Trees in this post are some of the trees planted at schools. Below is our backyard tree nursery. Most of these trees come from seed, tree giveaways or from our own yard.

Since 2015 I’ve planted 20-50 trees each year at schools, parks and beyond. I love watching them grow.
Want some trees? Look for free tree giveaways in your community, buy them from a nursery or grow them from seed. Enjoy!